Health Tourism In India Essay For Kids

Sample Medical School Essays


This section contains two sample medical school essays

  1. Medical School Sample Essay One
  2. Medical School Sample Essay Two

Medical School Essay One

Prompt: What makes you an excellent candidate for medical school? Why do you want to become a physician?

When I was twelve years old, a drunk driver hit the car my mother was driving while I was in the backseat. I have very few memories of the accident, but I do faintly recall a serious but calming face as I was gently lifted out of the car. The paramedic held my hand as we traveled to the hospital. I was in the hospital for several weeks and that same paramedic came to visit me almost every day. During my stay, I also got to know the various doctors and nurses in the hospital on a personal level. I remember feeling anxiety about my condition, but not sadness or even fear. It seemed to me that those around me, particularly my family, were more fearful of what might happen to me than I was. I don’t believe it was innocence or ignorance, but rather a trust in the abilities of my doctors. It was as if my doctors and I had a silent bond. Now that I’m older I fear death and sickness in a more intense way than I remember experiencing it as a child. My experience as a child sparked a keen interest in how we approach pediatric care, especially as it relates to our psychological and emotional support of children facing serious medical conditions. It was here that I experienced first-hand the power and compassion of medicine, not only in healing but also in bringing unlikely individuals together, such as adults and children, in uncommon yet profound ways. And it was here that I began to take seriously the possibility of becoming a pediatric surgeon.

My interest was sparked even more when, as an undergraduate, I was asked to assist in a study one of my professors was conducting on how children experience and process fear and the prospect of death. This professor was not in the medical field; rather, her background is in cultural anthropology. I was very honored to be part of this project at such an early stage of my career. During the study, we discovered that children face death in extremely different ways than adults do. We found that children facing fatal illnesses are very aware of their condition, even when it hasn’t been fully explained to them, and on the whole were willing to fight their illnesses, but were also more accepting of their potential fate than many adults facing similar diagnoses. We concluded our study by asking whether and to what extent this discovery should impact the type of care given to children in contrast to adults. I am eager to continue this sort of research as I pursue my medical career. The intersection of medicine, psychology, and socialization or culture (in this case, the social variables differentiating adults from children) is quite fascinating and is a field that is in need of better research.

Although much headway has been made in this area in the past twenty or so years, I feel there is a still a tendency in medicine to treat diseases the same way no matter who the patient is. We are slowly learning that procedures and drugs are not always universally effective. Not only must we alter our care of patients depending upon these cultural and social factors, we may also need to alter our entire emotional and psychological approach to them as well.

It is for this reason that I’m applying to the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, as it has one of the top programs for pediatric surgery in the country, as well as several renowned researchers delving into the social, generational, and cultural questions in which I’m interested. My approach to medicine will be multidisciplinary, which is evidenced by the fact that I’m already double-majoring in early childhood psychology and pre-med, with a minor in cultural anthropology. This is the type of extraordinary care that I received as a child—care that seemed to approach my injuries with a much larger and deeper picture than that which pure medicine cannot offer—and it is this sort of care I want to provide my future patients. I turned what might have been a debilitating event in my life—a devastating car accident—into the inspiration that has shaped my life since. I am driven and passionate. And while I know that the pediatric surgery program at Johns Hopkins will likely be the second biggest challenge I will face in my life, I know that I am up for it. I am ready to be challenged and prove to myself what I’ve been telling myself since that fateful car accident: I will be a doctor.


Medical School Essay Two

Prompt: Where do you hope to be in ten years’ time?

If you had told me ten years ago that I would be writing this essay and planning for yet another ten years into the future, part of me would have been surprised. I am a planner and a maker of to-do lists, and it has always been my plan to follow in the steps of my father and become a physician. This plan was derailed when I was called to active duty to serve in Iraq as part of the War on Terror.

I joined the National Guard before graduating high school and continued my service when I began college. My goal was to receive training that would be valuable for my future medical career, as I was working in the field of emergency health care. It was also a way to help me pay for college. When I was called to active duty in Iraq for my first deployment, I was forced to withdraw from school, and my deployment was subsequently extended. I spent a total of 24 months deployed overseas, where I provided in-the-field medical support to our combat troops. While the experience was invaluable not only in terms of my future medical career but also in terms of developing leadership and creative thinking skills, it put my undergraduate studies on hold for over two years. Consequently, my carefully-planned journey towards medical school and a medical career was thrown off course. Thus, while ten-year plans are valuable, I have learned from experience how easily such plans can dissolve in situations that are beyond one’s control, as well as the value of perseverance and flexibility.

Eventually, I returned to school. Despite my best efforts to graduate within two years, it took me another three years, as I suffered greatly from post-traumatic stress disorder following my time in Iraq. I considered abandoning my dream of becoming a physician altogether, since I was several years behind my peers with whom I had taken biology and chemistry classes before my deployment. Thanks to the unceasing encouragement of my academic advisor, who even stayed in contact with me when I was overseas, I gathered my strength and courage and began studying for the MCAT. To my surprise, my score was beyond satisfactory and while I am several years behind my original ten-year plan, I am now applying to Brown University’s School of Medicine.

I can describe my new ten-year plan, but I will do so with both optimism and also caution, knowing that I will inevitably face unforeseen complications and will need to adapt appropriately. One of the many insights I gained as a member of the National Guard and by serving in war-time was the incredible creativity medical specialists in the Armed Forces employ to deliver health care services to our wounded soldiers on the ground. I was part of a team that was saving lives under incredibly difficult circumstances—sometimes while under heavy fire and with only the most basic of resources. I am now interested in how I can use these skills to deliver health care in similar circumstances where basic medical infrastructure is lacking. While there is seemingly little in common between the deserts of Fallujah and rural Wyoming, where I’m currently working as a volunteer first responder in a small town located more than 60 miles from the nearest hospital, I see a lot of potential uses for the skills that I gained as a National Guardsman. As I learned from my father, who worked with Doctors Without Borders for a number of years, there is quite a bit in common between my field of knowledge from the military and working in post-conflict zones. I feel I have a unique experience from which to draw as I embark on my medical school journey, experiences that can be applied both here and abroad.

In ten years’ time, I hope to be trained in the field of emergency medicine, which, surprisingly, is a specialization that is actually lacking here in the United States as compared to similarly developed countries. I hope to conduct research in the field of health care infrastructure and work with government agencies and legislators to find creative solutions to improving access to emergency facilities in currently underserved areas of the United States, with an aim towards providing comprehensive policy reports and recommendations on how the US can once again be the world leader in health outcomes. While the problems inherent in our health care system are not one-dimensional and require a dynamic approach, one of the solutions as I see it is to think less in terms of state-of-the-art facilities and more in terms of access to primary care. Much of the care that I provide as a first responder and volunteer is extremely effective and also relatively cheap. More money is always helpful when facing a complex social and political problem, but we must think of solutions above and beyond more money and more taxes. In ten years I want to be a key player in the health care debate in this country and offering innovative solutions to delivering high quality and cost-effective health care to all our nation’s citizens, especially to those in rural and otherwise underserved areas.

Of course, my policy interests do not replace my passion for helping others and delivering emergency medicine. As a doctor, I hope to continue serving in areas of the country that, for one reason or another, are lagging behind in basic health care infrastructure. Eventually, I would also like to take my knowledge and talents abroad and serve in the Peace Corps or Doctors Without Borders.

In short, I see the role of physicians in society as multifunctional: they are not only doctors who heal, they are also leaders, innovators, social scientists, and patriots. Although my path to medical school has not always been the most direct, my varied and circuitous journey has given me a set of skills and experiences that many otherwise qualified applicants lack. I have no doubt that the next ten years will be similarly unpredictable, but I can assure you that no matter what obstacles I face, my goal will remain the same. I sincerely hope to begin the next phase of my journey at Brown University. Thank you for your kind attention.

To learn more about what to expect from the study of medicine, check out our Study Medicine in the US section.

Sample Essays

Related Content:

Tips for a Successful Medical School Essay

  • If you’re applying through AMCAS, remember to keep your essay more general rather than tailored to a specific medical school, because your essay will be seen by multiple schools.
  • AMCAS essays are limited to 5300 characters—not words! This includes spaces.
  • Make sure the information you include in your essay doesn't conflict with the information in your other application materials.
  • In general, provide additional information that isn’t found in your other application materials. Look at the essay as an opportunity to tell your story rather than a burden.
  • Keep the interview in mind as you write. You will most likely be asked questions regarding your essay during the interview, so think about the experiences you want to talk about.
  • When you are copying and pasting from a word processor to the AMCAS application online, formatting and font will be lost. Don’t waste your time making it look nice. Be sure to look through the essay once you’ve copied it into AMCAS and edit appropriately for any odd characters that result from pasting.
  • Avoid overly controversial topics. While it is fine to take a position and back up your position with evidence, you don’t want to sound narrow-minded.
  • Revise, revise, revise. Have multiple readers look at your essay and make suggestions. Go over your essay yourself many times and rewrite it several times until you feel that it communicates your message effectively and creatively.
  • Make the opening sentence memorable. Admissions officers will read dozens of personal statements in a day. You must say something at the very beginning to catch their attention, encourage them to read the essay in detail, and make yourself stand out from the crowd.
  • Character traits to portray in your essay include: maturity, intellect, critical thinking skills, leadership, tolerance, perseverance, and sincerity.

Additional Tips for a Successful Medical School Essay

  • Regardless of the prompt, you should always address the question of why you want to go to medical school in your essay.
  • Try to always give concrete examples rather than make general statements. If you say that you have perseverance, describe an event in your life that demonstrates perseverance.
  • There should be an overall message or theme in your essay. In the example above, the theme is overcoming unexpected obstacles.
  • Make sure you check and recheck for spelling and grammar!
  • Unless you’re very sure you can pull it off, it is usually not a good idea to use humor or to employ the skills you learned in creative writing class in your personal statement. While you want to paint a picture, you don’t want to be too poetic or literary.
  • Turn potential weaknesses into positives. As in the example above, address any potential weaknesses in your application and make them strengths, if possible. If you have low MCAT scores or something else that can’t be easily explained or turned into a positive, simply don’t mention it.

Tourism refer to the trips that involve travelling of people outside the place of their residence or work for leisure, pleasure, vacation, business, personal, or other purposes.

Tourism is an important source of income for many countries. Nowadays, it is considered an industry.

Tourism is important for the growth and development of a developing country like India. The advantages and disadvantages of Tourism has been discussed in this article.

Advantages of Tourism

Now-a-days, tourism is the flourishing industry. The advantages of tourism includes employment opportunity, growth of service sector, foreign exchange earnings, opportunity for recreation, economic growth, cultural exchange, better international relations, enjoyment, better health and wellness.

1. Employment: Tourism provides employment opportunity for local people. Tourism industry is growing very rapidly in India employing millions of people.

2. Growth of Service Sector: Services sector engaged in tourism sector get the most out of tourism sector. A large number of businesses engaged in service sector such as airlines, hotel, surface transportation, etc. grows with the growth of tourism industry.

3. Foreign Exchange earning: Many tourist destinations attract a good number of foreign tourists. This helps the country earn foreign exchange.

4. Recreation: Travel based recreation provides relief from the monotony of daily routine. A change in place and climate helps a traveler to recharge his mind, body and spirit.

5. Economic growth: Tourism helps in the development of economy of a country. It helps in the overall GDP development of a country. It helps the local people to earn their livelihood. The tourists spend lavishly during vacation. The local people engaged in assisting the tourists earn a good income.

6. Meet new people: It helps the local people to get in touch with the people and country. It also helps building international relations.

7. Cultural exchange: Tourism gives opportunity to people of various cultures to assimilate together. People belonging to various cultures meet together and understand each other. This gives them an opportunity to build respect for each other. Hence, it fosters cultural harmony.

8. Health and wellness: Many people visit other places for the purpose of getting treatment for diseases, improving health and prevent diseases. This is called Medical and health tourism. Wellness tourism aim at achieving complete mental, psychological and physical well-being. There are many tourism destinations offering yoga, aerobics, and other therapies for improving health and wellness.

9. Fun and enjoyment: Many people travel for fun and enjoyment. They simply do whatever excites them, or gives them enjoyment.

10. Spend time with families: The life of modern people is hectic. They are too busy in their professional life. There is immense pressure even on children. Hence, such people plan for a holiday trip to spend quality time with their families.

Disadvantages of Tourism

The disadvantages of tourism includes increased expenditure, time-consuming, environmental hazards, loss of architecture and ecological balance, increase in waste products, damage to wild-life, and disruption in socio-economic and cultural setup.

1. Tourism involves huge expenditure on part of the tourists.Travelling costs includes vehicle hire charges, hotel and resort rent, food cost, etc. This increases the overall spending of the person.

2. You need to take out few days out of your busy schedule to visit tourist places. Hence, tourism is often time-consuming.

3. Leisure trips are good for health, mind and body. However, hectic trips may cause stress and effect health.

4. It may also lead to environmental hazards such as environmental pollution due to use of cigars, plastic bags.

5. In order to attract more tourists and earn more profits sprawling resorts are built cutting down thousands of casuarinas trees beside sea beaches.

6. These resorts destroy both scenic beauty of the place by paying no attention to local architecture and ecology.

7. As a result of indiscriminate construction of high-rise buildings and infrastructure facilities, the provision of water supply and waste disposal facilities may get disrupted.

8. Famous tourist spots attract an inflow of residing population. This may lead to an increase in demand for residential houses, roads, and food for permanent population. Under such situation, an increase in tourist activities beyond certain level may adversely affect the economy of the state.

8. Overuse of natural wealth is a serious problem, tourist overuse of mountain trails resulting in abundance in dumping of waste products, food tins, etc.

9. Damage to wildlife parks is a visible phenomenon. The ground vegetation may suffer due to the tourists’ shoes. Food habits of animal impaired.

10. Due immense changes, pollution, and dirt, the landscape may lose its scenic beauty.

11. Tourism may have damaging socio-cultural effects. Local people demean themselves to earn more or imitate alien culture, new lifestyles, foreign culture.

Solution

1. Green Tourism: Tourism should be promoted with care. Once the natural beauty and human-made beauties are lost, tourism loses its charm and attraction and will collapse. The benefits of tourism will stay only if due care is taken for the longevity and survival of natural environment. So, today environment friendly or green tourism are being introduced by tourism industries.

2. Avoid Ecological imbalance and health hazards: We should keep tourism within planned limits. Every care should be taken to avoid ecological imbalance and health hazards.

3. Preserve local culture and tradition: Tourism must not play havoc with traditions and protected societies. New technique, high-teach communication may bring cultural setbacks, degradation to preserved communities.

Conclusion

Stability of nation is necessary for development of tourism industry. Political disturbances hamper tourism. India can reap benefits from this industry, can add to own coiffure, earn foreign money if tourists are attracted to Buddhist stupas, Hindu temples, Mughal, Rajput palaces, forts, and victory towers, rock-cut caves, elaborately laid our gardens.

Throughout our beautified country there are many thousands of attractions such as glaciers, snow capped peaks, lower hill stations, wild life sanctuaries, deep rain-forests, formidable desert in Rajasthan, sea beaches immense in number in east, west, southern parts.

Adventure sports i.e., trekking, skating, rafting in turbulent rivers, gliding, canoeing, mountaineering are other attractive attributes available here. Galore of cultural differences resultant in varieties of cuisines to please diverse tongues, textiles, artifacts, handicrafts pleasing eyes are other gifts.

Indian tourism is only a small portion of the world tourism industry. So, we must use all potentialities by proper planning, financing acquiring experience, packaging marketing, and boosting creativity, make outstanding appeal to travelers and seek help from private entrepreneurs.

Category: Essays, Paragraphs and Articles

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